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for the environment? specifically, twice as bad as traditional cars? a shocking new study says they may not be so green after all. even when they say it's not, it is always about money melissa: let's take a look at the day's market headlines. investors staying cautious before tomorrow's earnings season kickoff with alcoa. summit between eu finance ministers brought modest declines to stocks. stocks closed down 26 points. shares of apple fell more than 2%. there are report that is a weekend strike broke out at a foxconn factory in china, a major a sembler in china. foxconn is denying the report. they have had major problems. >>> netflix shares surged more than 10% on the news closing at highest price since july. >>> our top story tonight, gas prices in california hitting another all-time high. now they have reached a record breaking $4.67 an average but some stations are charging close to 7 bucks. now get this. police are dealing with gas thieves stealing from stations. is there any end in sight? fox news's adam housley is live in los angeles with more. adam, what is going on out there in californ
now has a game control over [inaudible] has deemed a po lou assistant, danger to the environment. and co2 is the manhattan and keeps us alive. the circle of life and attempt to oppress co2 epitomizes the kind of antinature, antiimper prize spirit of the administration. it's the reason we need another supply side of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty." >> i would have changed quite a lot. i mean, there. all kind of detail that have changed. but i found that do try to change one thing would be to change everything. so, you know, you have in to a bunch of editorial work. instead of changing it, i essentially retained the old book and added 30,000 new words at the beginning and end. and revision of my monetary policy in the middle. and so it's a new book. but it contains the old book. >> and when you say a revights of the monetary politician. what cow do you mean by that? >> well, i fail to make clear in the original version of wealthy and poverty that i believe that stable currency. i don't believe in
on renewables and it felt right to apply it to the environment which contributes 40% of emissions. ashley: how has it gone since early days? >> it has been a great lesson to join a startup company. we have gone the successful fund-raisers and to do it in a tough economic environment helped prove we need to be resilience and continually get the cost down and get buildings up faster and drive up that as that. is exciting to see large health-care companies and others adopting it. ashley: what is the average cost of the buildings? >> hard to say. education costs different from medical facilities but the key thing is right now the traditional construction project only 20% of what gets put into the final building price point why is material. 40% is a risk and overhead. we want to reverse that equation. we are more like boeing. quality manufacturing and the attitude is if bowling can assemble a 737 in a matter of days why does it take 24 months to get health care clinic? ashley: how these structures come? i they and flat pack can you put it together? >> precisely. they're so important to us because t
environment saying it's challenging and reported a drop in its first half net profit. it was really dragged down by some sluggish sales numbers. it's got a cost of one billion pounds. the company trying to fix its domestic operations, investing in stores, people and products. the online department has been a huge push. the contrast has been -- you can see the varying performances of these two stocks in the trading session today. its numberns coming in fairly well. this is the third biggest supermarket chain here in the uk. take a look at the spike in the airline. it's certainly making some strong inroads out there. raised its profit guidance. it's also reported a boost in strong demand from some of the european beach roots from london, so it's been using the flights to fly into some of those little nations. it seems as though the pursestrings for holiday travelers has certainly being loosened a little bit. let's take a look at what's playing out on debt markets today across the charts. you see prices are moving high. we're still seeing below the 1.5% level. the constant question mark surrou
, i learned on the campaign trail. there's always a winner and loser. the political environment just like the business world, is highly competitive. with every campaign season there's always a new crop of start-ups. innovation incubators. and so, i guess the campaign is a little bit of an entrepreneurial showcase. i think a lot of us think we see these ads and i guess keeping the campaign is disliked a big marketing machine that spits out the ads we see on tv and the candidates are sending mail to us an e-mail to our in box and the phone calls and so forth. but if you peel back the curtain, you might find something. a something difference you find a very complex, highly detailed operation. there's a million things happening at once. there are things happening around the candidates, there are things happening around the headquarters operations, things happening in field offices. everything from where a candidate will stay, who will stand with the candidates, what site he should choose for that and how many people should come to the event and right down to the helium in the balloons an
, a few pennies better. that is $100 a year. operating earnings from the s&p in an environment where the long-term u.s. government reference riskless rate is under 2%. that is a bargain. melissa: i was interested to see the latest trading volumes. you are talking about the average investor walking away. in august, it was down 37%. that is year over year. that is compared to last august. when we see that the markets are up 9% for the year, i wonder if the individual investor is walking away from returns? >> i think so, melissa. the investing class is still undergoing dramatic shock and recovery from it. that is why all of these bond flows continue to go into funds and those fund managers have to go by treasuries at 1.6-1.7 because they have to do something to put it to work. if you believe that interest rates are going to be low for a number of years, and i do, i believe bernanke will do what he says, then stock prices are headed higher. maybe much higher. lori: isn't it a problem then that the fed is manipulating the stock market? therefore, do you have to be a little bit cautious th
compromise with the enemy. it is not going to happen. it is a terrible environment for the big deal that needs to get done. so acknowledge the reality. let's do the deal in 2013 but let's not cause a recession. basically just extend current policy to the extent policy and hope we get 2013 intact. that is my goal. >> doug, let me throw out a theory to get your reaction. the theory is this. that as long as the discussion about tax reform is an ongoing argument about the bush tax cuts -- >> i'm so tired of the bush tax cuts i can barely stand it. >> i think most people would agree. >> they have been talked about for 10 years? can we talk about something else? >> that is exactly the point. as long as you have extended the bush tax cuts, as donald said, only half of this is about the bush tax cuts. >> right. >> but in the public discussion it is the bush tax cuts. so as long as you extend them, can you get out of that debate? conversely if you let them all go. >>, does that change the framing of this we're no longer talking about the bush tax cuts, we're just talking about the tax code a
can be. liz: how do you deal with the low interest-rate environment or refinancing loans and losing a couple basis points on every loan? >> it is true this extended low-interest rate environment is not favorable to bank earnings. liz: ben bernanke ordeal with it? >> i can also understand his position that stimulus hit the economy. it is good for bar worse to have low interest rates and now we have lower rates from short to long it is easier to borrow or give people reasons to borrow so last time we checked we made money when people borrow loans. it is good for us but it does shrink the spread on our loans. that is why you have to be cost-effective, acquiring good clients and looking at how to generate more business. liz: they expects fourth quarter loan growth? >> as we have talked about it we continue to see among our commercial clients that they continue to borrow and acquiring competitors and investing in business and doing things commensurate with an industry that returned to profitability. they are not hiring which is part of why we talk with ben bernanke about q e 3 and the th
of the deloitte cfo service. they were asked what their views are on the current operating environment. joining us with more, chief economist at deloitte. good to see you. i suppose we had a record second quarter of declines. >> confidence went through the floor back in june on the result of what's going on in the euro area. you've seen a bit of a bounce. risk appetite up is bit so i think cfos are looking at the same things the equity markets are looking at, qe-3 in the states, ecb bond buying. but the interesting thing is the underlying stock support is getting rather more defensive, they're more focused on cash. if respect. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?f re >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?espe >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?ct. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence? >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence? >> a lot of concerns relate to things outside the uk, in particular the weakness of the euro area, uncertainty. so there are things
of cisco, having the experience that you've had at yahoo! tell me how you see the environment changes and where specifically you would expect growth to happen in technology in the next five years. >> well, i think technology in general -- probably the biggest challenge is not so much the social interactions but everybody's talking so much about data. data is very, very hard to mine correctly. so i think you're going to see a push back towards a lot of enterprise apps that really figure out how it get information to the companies so they can actually be more personalized for the user, but easy to say, a lot to do. >> and really quick, on what you're seeing out there, how tough is europe right now for technology? what are you seeing in terms of the global slow down? >> well, europe continues to baffle us in general in technology. it looks like it's getting softer, not stronger. you know, companies that diversified over the past 20 years do make sure they had good portfolios in all the regions, you know, are taking a hit now with europe. i think it's broad based, so it shouldn't be a kno
at the international trading environment and worry about that. this is the answer to your question. a world and which the united states is strong but all of the institutions is eroding is not a world of 2011. the united states has an interest in trying its best to shore up institutions. >> this is great. >> get set to run it, john. >> a couple of quick points. my thesis is not the institutions are independent. they are instruments of power. they are used to signal limits on power. power is never divorce from institution. a venture that regard, i idea that the united states has been so brilliant for half a century or longer because, it has allowed it to make the power more durable and expensive but also making it more delimited and less based on arbitrary use of power and the most traditional sense. there are a vehemence of republican allow for the state to be more influential by allowing it to signal its own strength. a couple of more point about this. my underlying argument is that we are shifting from one organized around trilateral world, the u.s. rip germany, japan, the kind of trilateral system.
to stimulate cargo. the cargo has to be there from the manufacturers and from the general economic environment. but next year, the car go industry might pick up a little bit. the conditions for cargo are still very bad now. but again, overall the industry of course is still more passenger than cargo. and it's been a bit of a double whammy this year because for the long call carriers operating out of asia, they're heavily exposed to markets like europe where there's been an impact. >> are we going get anymore meaningful consolidation? i don't see eus saying to america you should really allow for proper mergers between european and u.s. airlines. do you think that's ever going it to be allowed? >> there's still a lot of steps to be taken to allow that to happen. true global consolidation, a lot of countries still have policies that limit foreign investment in the airline sector. so we need to see a lot of changes in the regulatory environment to allow that to happen. in the meantime, we did see a lot of consolidation continue to happen within regions like latin america, like north america, like
and retail business are rising. and also in some lines of the industrial business. so the overall environment for the insurance industry is very good. your free float is about 20%. will you stop here for a while or will you raise money in the future? >> we'll raise money in the future, however, not for the next 24 months. we are sufficiently capitalized now after this ipo on for the next 24 months, but there will be further capital increases in the future. this is just our first step in to becoming a listed insurance company. >> all right. and just give us your view where we stand at the moment with the world economy. because it's interesting where you're looking at your operations. eurozone still in the grips of recession or low growth, weaker growth in asia. just give us your sense of how you view the world and how it transfers back into your business. >> i'm 100% sure that the euro will survive. the euro is instrumental for the future of europe. the emerging market particularly in brazil and mexico are very interesting growing markets for the future. and also the middle and eastern europea
to the environment. carbos products rely heavily on fossil fuels. one researcher says the new project is a step up in scale. >> normally we are in our labs doing in test tube size scales. occasionally, we might use a 100 leader reactor. this time, the goal is to go big, tons, a cubic meters. >> the pilot plant is just one of many looking to shake up the industry. the bio economy association consists of 80 industry leaders. they players -- big players like chemical producers, to them, the association is an investment in the future. >> the future of the industry is green. everyone talks about sustainability. we walk the walk and frankly we have no other choice. the oil wells will not float forever. >> oil refineries still loom larger, but the winds are changing. >> not to an update from somalia where african union and somali troops have consolidated their grip on a city there. >> the southern port was the last urban stronghold of the islamist militia which made what it called a tactical retreat over the weekend. the al qaeda-linked militants were driven out of the capital last year and continue to c
uniforms but plenty of guns, a potential danger for u.s. troops. >> if you come to an environment like this there are afghans with weapons. >> they're not going to put away their weapons just because we're here. as you see, everybody else has got theirs, too. >> reporter: you've built this relationship on trust and now you're saying well, hold on, maybe we don't trust you and-- that's not what you're saying. >> right. >> reporter: but that's the impression. >> that may be the message. we tried to soft than blow as much as we can. they felt guilty for the incidents themselves so they understood why we were trying to do this. we're going to continue this relationship as best we can given this and they were good with it. >> reporter: the soldiers that we were with hoped to finish vetting the afghan forces this week but, scott, commanders have a new list of conditions that have to be met before their joint operations can start again and we're told the clock would be reset if there's a new insider attack. >> pelley: hard work to do in afghanistan. charlie thanks very much. the mystery of th
sleep. ideally, with your light sleep aspect, you want to have a dark environment. dark environment releases the hormone melatonin, which is your sleep hormone. >> that you put over your eyes. >> when it's light out, your body inhibits the release of melatonin. in a quiet environment, you want to make sure that off quiet environment because that interrupts your sleep cycles, too. >> maybe some ear plugs or white noise. >> ear plugs, or white noise. but when you sleep with the tv on, set the alarm so 20 minutes later it turns off. >> an alarm clock, you say? >> ideally you wake up without an alarm clock. if you need it, use it initially. you want good pillow so that you have the proper biomechanics. >> that's a great looking april low. pretty comfortable? >> tempurpedic. >> napping is okay, but don't throw off your sleep schedule. >> get a schedule, high qualltism it's not about doing more, it's about the highest quality sleep possible. >> and take some vacation time. sleep a lot. mark, thank you. nice to see you. >>> from slum to opera singer, a member of mitt romney's much maligned
. if the national environment is destroyed, then it is really bad, and not just for our own investment, but for the area in general. at the beginning, i thought i would get involved in the fight against it, that i would not go along with it, but now, i am having my doubts. i wonder whether things are not better as they stand a if would be better off moving away. >> of course, that is not with this conservationist wants, but more and more manor houses on her map are marked in pink, indicating that they are in serious condition. >> recently, one of the manor houses had disappeared completely. there was just a heap of stones. fear that in the next five or 10 years, and aiding houses will be beyond repair. >> it could soon be dotted with ruins, ruins with a certain melancholic charm for sure, but hardly evidence of the prosperity that east germans were promised after unification. >> that brings us to the end of this edition of "european journal" from dw studios in brussels. from all of us here, thanks very much for watching. until next nine -- until next time, bye for now! captioned by the
in international business. they want to help japanese firms survive competition in global environment. professionals with experience working overseas will teach business skills once a week through january. the instructors come from 12 companies in various industries including finance, chemical, and automotive. one worked for a leading chemical firm. he gave advice based on over 20 years of experience working in the u.s. he told students to stand firm and believe in themselves instead of relying on foreign koun counterparts to lead the way. >> translator: i want to be someone who has both a global and local perspective. i want to be confident in knowing what i'm capable of. >> translator: japan has experienced two lost decades of growth. we think if students can create a new path to the future, the country will be able to grow again. >>> a japanese film director returned from the prestigious toronto international film festival with an award in hand. he directed "the land of hope." it was inspired by the nuclear disaster in fukushima. he tells the story of an accident that devastates re
we do with your clients. what we're seeing in really in environment of really slow growth next several years due to our fiscal situation, focus on good, solid companies paying solid dividends above the average of the stock market. >> do you think about minimizing tax consequences? >> absolutely. in a lot of the nonqualified portfolios that we manage, there is a pretty high mlp concentration. we do use mlps. >> master limited partnerships, usually oil and gas. >> right. so kinder morgan is one of the ones we like to use. actually it pays roughly a six 1/2% dividend. a good percentage of that dividend is considered return of basis. >> kinder morgan is one of the stocks you like right now. you also like vodafone? >> right. >> why vodafone and did not say verizon? >> good you mentioned verizon. vodafone owns 45% of the verizon wireless. >> right. >> the noise thing about vodafone it is more undervalued than verizon and also pay as higher dividend yield than verizon. a great way to play verizon wireless without all the wireline issues when it comes to buying verizon. it is really a
. the environment has gotten such a got you environment that even the politicians themselves and regulators have to do their business with one eye over the shoulders for fear of being dragged into some congressional committee or they'll be exposed for having to talk to leaders. so i think this idea of working together, i think in order to allow people to work together, there has to be a little bit of a letup. another thing is you can't kill people if everything doesn't work out perfectly. who the heck is going to take the jobs in business and government. you'll always get people that want to be ceo and senator and cabinet secretaries, but it might not be the people you want if you make it so punishing for them to take the job and unsustainable to be in the job because who gets it right all the time? >> that's actually an important distinction. john chambers and i were talking about it. in business, you take risks. some of them work out. some of them don't. in government, it's very difficult to take risks because if something goes badly, you're going to get pilloried for it. there's no particular
. ashley: charles, bringing you back in. i want to know what you like in this environment? what's your picks? >> i just want to respond to the previous guest. ashley: go ahead. >> all that's in the stock market are shares of stocks and money. the market goes up because companies didn't want zero return on their balance sheet cash so they bought shares back. unfortunately, that stopped in september. september was the first month in the $20 billion more share sales than buying. insiders are now -- for the last two months, sold 1 # 1 times the amount of shares bought. the sell by ratio is 11-to-1. the engyps that run market up shrink the float. companies grow the float, insiders selling, and, you know, yes, the fed is easing indefinitely. that means there's no more fed easing to anticipate. without anticipation, why is anybody -- you know, i don't see how the market rallies here. i could be wrong, but that's what i think. ashley: dan? >> the universe shrinks in two ways, share repurchases and companies buys other companies. 3m bought another, and when the deal is completed because it's a
bank and under the current regulatory environment, as bank took a look at his business plan and said here is your problem -- you are asset rich and cash poor. he said i know that, if i had the cash it would not be here for a loan. he would have to over collateralize a loan by 150% under the current regulatory environment. i want him to be able to grow his business. it's a classic example of regulation killing jobs. we need to make sure we have the proper amount of legislation but not overregulation. my commercials talk about reducing spending, and powering our work force for training for jobs available and developing a comprehensive energy policy to put our people back to work, energy independence to protect our environment. >> 30 seconds to rebut. >> you have been running some of the most deceitful attack at the state has ever seen. don't try to pretend that has not been what's happening in that race. when your campaign was asked why you don't start talking about the issues, your campaign manager said it would be a senseless exercise. that's right. for linda mcmahon talking at the i
between from a kitraditi conservatives and ahmadinejad, who is to blame for the current environment. so that's the part where we'll have much more debate. and the real intention or the real intent of the sanctions is to change iran's position on the nuclear program. that's likely to be less effective. iran needs face saving mechanisms. a deal which guarantees that domestically iran looks weak. so going into negotiations with the west -- >> is there such a solution where they can come to an agreement that satisfies both his demands for that and the west demands for no nuclear proliferation? >> it's a delicate matter. it's framing the agreement as if it's a win/win situation, but such conditions would directly not allow iran to develop a nuclear weapon. negotiations will be hard. >> good to see you. thanks very much. henry, thanks for joining us, as well. >>> still to come, the controversial fracking technique used in the natural gas sector is rapidly gaining progress. we'll find out why. >>> these are the headlines. september employment report in the u.s. is on the minds of investors and
of the more mature companies. >> what matters is if you create an environment for people to invest in the united states. the last several administrations i went to washington if intel is going to build this next major manufacturing facility the net present value of the facility in a u.s. compared to a lower corporate tax environment is $ billion. it's a tough sell to be patriotic and have that facility in the u.s. cut the corporate tax rate down to a competitive level. i think technology will continue to advance. the problem is keeping the good ideas in the u.s. and create jobs. >> it can happen in spite of things or you can help or be sort of in the way? >> or you can facilitate for an economy which is growing. what we do with foreign graduate students, taxpayer money pays to educate them to get thai masters and ph.d.s and tech topics and our immigration policy says go home. it's a brilliant philosophy. >> you said the growth in intel will be abroad. whatever the tax policy is, i imagine you have to go abroad on manufacturing and engineering. you want to go to the customer. even i
are taking risks. >> oh, sure, in this environment, i mean, you know, we're watching liquidity like a hawk because there's great sense tomorrow morning it could go the other way, in effect you don't invest as much, you don't take as much risk. >> how would you counter the argument that businesspeople and the wealthy have had their way for the past 2030-years as they've increased their lead in terms of income disparity and gotten richer and richer, and you would have hoped that some of that would have trickled down, if it works you would have hoped the average person would have participated in the good times and haven't and you need a president that is going to come in for the powerless people that aren't able to set policy and pay to go do things and you need someone that will represent them in the future. how was is that pretty damned good? >> yes, sir. >> you can take this. thank you for writing it for me. >> i'll get you a job at "the new york times." the reality is as follows. the whole focus has been on how the quote, one percenters or ten percenters, how the top earners moved ahead o
to be a challenging environment. mandy, great point. china's deceleration is very important. it's very real. you're seeing that in commodity complex. i think that revenue line is going to be very, very important. that's probably going to come in soft. >> all right. we'll leave it there. thanks, everybody. appreciate your time tonight. we'll keep watching this market and the fundamentals around it. we look now where the big money is eyeing and whether or not foreign money is coming into the u.s. we have henry m henry mcveigh w. tell me what you're hearing. >> the clients with the long-term focus are the ones we traditionally work with. we see opportunities. we have a very big presence in asia. i was just over in hong kong and india. we're finding things to do on the consumer side. i would tell you, i do think the chinese economy in particular, the export economy, is structurally broken. i think that's a big change. i've been going to china since 1995. i think there's a fundamental shift in what's going on. we saw that in the caterpillar numbers. you saw that in the federal express numbers. some p
the federal government take advantage of the low interest rate environment and issue $500 billion in 30-year bonds to fix the nation's infrastructure. believe me, the market would lap it up. fifth, i would slap tariffs on good made by countries that pollute when they make those countries. that would stop the endless parade of jobs migrating from our country to other countries that don't. they have a ridiculous competitive advantage over us. six, i would insist there be a course in high school called money where kids could learn what money is, how to save, how to invest. if people have financial literacy, they would be going to the stock market and they could learn to speculate wisely, perhaps to find their own therapeutics. seventh, i would appoint a steven jobs memorial competitiveness czar to figure out how our businesses could be made more competitive and find out what they need in order to hire and expand, not government handouts but perhaps trying to get educated engineers trying to help these companies. i would reappoint ben bernanke as chairman of the federal reserve. if it weren't fo
environment, some big market changes, but you have a management team now who has a handle on the problems, who knows what to do. we've got a plan to fix this company. and i think investors have to decide, gee, do they think that hp can turn this ship around? do they believe in the management team? do they believe in our employees? do they believe that customers want hp to win, which i can tell you they do. and do they believe in the product lineup? we spent quite a bit of time yesterday at our analysts day talking about the coming products in each of our divisions. we showed our new pc lineup. we showed -- talked about our multifunction printers. we talked about ink in the office, ink advantage. we talked about our new, very energy efficient arm-based servers that i think could revolutionize the server market. we talked about three par and storage as well as we're the leader, really, now in the development of sdm, software-defined networking. so products are going to be a really important part of how we bring hp back. and investors got to look at that whole story and say, gee, do i think this
's environment? and how are clients allocating capital today? joining me now in a cnbc exclusive are two people at the forefront of those decisions. quinton price and robert kapito, the president of black rock. gentlemen, good to have you on the program. thank you so much for joining us. let me start with quinton, since i don't think you've been with us before. nice to have you on the program. you are the global head of the alpha strategies group. really, a global opportunity for allocating capital. to what do you attribute the rally today? was it the ecb, do you think? was it the election last night? what's going on? the debate, rather. >> europe has been driving the market for months. ever since draghi made his comments, going back two months, we've seen confidence flowing back into equities. we've removed the downside risk for markets. i think that's continued. i think people have got confidence back from last week and we're seeing a number of, you know, good reports of pick up in china and stuff which is all helping to create a positive tone. >> so you do believe the tail risk is not as bad
and education. and also making environment where it's easy enough for businesses to hire people and employ people and kind of stay out of everybody's way. >> host: how is it doing on those? >> caller: i don't think it's doing really well when the minimum wage is sitting at $10 an hour in some states. it's not there yet but it's getting very quick. and that isn't enough to employ people some people like myself, a small businessman, it's hard for me to employ more people when i'm having to pay so much for everything. the price of everything is going up, the price of fuel, the price of electricity, the price of food, the price of everything is going up right now. so i don't think the government is doing a good job. >> host: thanks in washington. "the wall street journal" this morning another comparison between the two candidates is and so much on the role of government, the definition of patriotism. president barack obama says he wants the new economic patriotism that mitt romney calls the presidential campaign a battle for the soul of america. the candidates are not only racing to win an ele
stocks keep making all-time highs in this environment? >> with us today are sam stovall and our own bob pisani. sam, it's going to come down to earnin earnings, right, which starts tomorrow? >> tomorrow. the bar is not just set low, it's set below, under water. >> below dirt. >> off the lows. capital iq is forecasting a 1.3% deline. it was down to 1.8%. big deal. i think some of the numbers underneath are a little more telling, such as right now the early beat ratio at 58% is below the average of 62%. in terms of guidance, those that are guiding negatively are 3.3 to 1 for those guiding positively. >> that sounds very negative for the stock market. >> well, i think it's baked in right now, or a lot of that is probably baked in. the real question is, whether we're likely to be seeing qe3 as the trough -- >> how can it be baked in if we're sitting at 4 1/2 year highs? how is that baked in? >> exactly. >> i think nothing is really new. what has come out yet that's going to tell us things are a lot worse than we anticipated? materials are expected to show 20% earnings decline. energy down 1
interest rate environment -- who isn't -- check out big pharma. which companies may be preparing to boost their dividends coming up. >>> as we head out, here's how the five biggest dividends in the dow jones industrial 30. our favorite, intel, up 1.68%. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. like in a special ops mission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal collateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeting stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. trade architect. td ameritrade's empowering web-based trading platform. trade commission-free for 60 days, and we'll throw in up to $600 when you open an account. governor of getting it done.
yesterday talking about the challenging environment and the year ahead is fix and build. the acceleration 2015 and we see selling down 12 1/2% this week alone. stuart: this is important because hewlett-packard is one of the great names of technology, printers, computers, a range of products, they're one of the greats of american technology and now down to a nine-year low. that's not a happy company. meg whitman runs it and has her work cut out for her. >> she's trying to turn around the company and talking about fix and build and they will have layoffs. everybody was hoping for a lot more, a lot faster and when you see the stock is down just 13% this week, obviously, disconcerting. stuart: can you get the stock price up by chopping away at the work force? very interesting question. nicole, thank you very much indeed. the dow industrials opened 40 points higher the first 90 seconds of business, there you go. gas prices, we bring you this news up only slightly. 3.78 for regular and diesel 4.08. the big story within the gas price arena. california, due to refinery problems there are gas pric
market, the environment, a bunch of things very uneven, and gas price that is have been higher, and take the scarce income away from consumers, and the nagging concerns about other things, about the elections, and what happens with tax policy and europe. and jobs and a little bit about gas. >> tell us a little bit about the elections. >> d do you think that people will feel better just knowing who's going to be in the white house, and then go ahead with financial decisions they were going to be making and buy whatever purchases they were thinking about. >> we hope it's going to work out like that. >> when they win, we don't know the congress they're going to work with. we don't know if it's something they can put their heads together and work with or the parties will be at logger heads. >> it will be organic. we have to see who is elected and the demeanor between the president and the congress he has to work with. >> susie: and you know we hear so much from the federal reserve about how much super low interest rats are going to help the economy. to what extent are the low rates motivatin
own internal problems to try to confront a more hostile external environment. continuing to in gauge, finding areas of cooperation and areas like energy keep our markets open the don't create a more hostile external environment. important we keep balance in the region. there is a fine line between balance and provocation that we want to stay on the side of balance and a constructive environment. >> dr. kissinger. i was surprised to hear you say comments by both candidates. the term extremely deplorable language about china. you have endorsed mitt romney. have you had that conversation with him? have you said i find your comments extremely deplorable? >> i have seen the appetite of two candidates competing with each other on how to deal with a strategy. both have achieved as applied to china. >> and trade. >> and it may be in china -- i am positive of the fact that appealing to china had taken part of the view on china policy that is not a secret. doesn't affect my basic intuition. >> mitt romney has talked about labeling china a currency manipulator. would that be productive? >> mayb
are headed next? if the u.s. economic environment remains relatively slow, traders predict new highs for the precious metal could come in the first half of next year. that's if gold is able to break through certain technical levels. >> i think if we can get above $1,816. we should see 19 and a quarter. if we can get above $1,925, then $2,000 is definitely in our sights. >> reporter: experts say one thing that could push gold prices above $2,000 an ounce this year is if president obama is re-elected. the thinking-- the president will keep bernanke employed, which means interest rates stay very, very low. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: stocks moved higher ahead of tomorrow's report on the september job market. the s&p 500 really gained moment just after 10:00 a.m. eastern time after the commerce department released its report on september factory orders. while total orders were down, it wasn't as bad as feared. the index finished higher by seven tenths of a percent. trading volume held steady on the big board-- 672 million shares. it was just under 1.6 billion on the nasdaq. fin
, given the environment we're in, does seem a touch odd. > > so what do you look at that's important? do you look at the payroll numbers? do you look at the participation numbers? > > all of them are important. they all serve and weigh into your forecast. the participation number is important because you need people participating in the workforce to push a country forward. that's at the lowest level it has been in 30 years. so there are fewer people today participating than there have been since 1981 in the workforce. the overall employment number is probably the most respected, the 114,000. that's crucial for the economy. you really need to see that kick up into the 200- to 250,000s before we start making headway into the employment problem that we have right now. > > every month they revise that number, so that will probably be changing soon. > > sure. these all are- not guesses, but there's a lot of deviation around them. and as we saw, i think last year's employment numbers were revised up 384,000 are the latest numbers. > > we'll talk to you in a month to see if we can stop scratchi
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